PUBLICATIONS


MAY 2020

 

A Functional Neuro-Anatomical Model of Human Attachment (NAMA): Insights from First- and Second-Person Social Neuroscience​

Attachment theory, developed by Mary Ainsworth and John Bowlby about seventy years ago, has become one of the most influential and comprehensive contemporary psychology theories. It predicts that early social interactions with significant others shape the emergence of distinct self- and other-representations, the latter affecting how we initiate and maintain social relationships across the lifespan. A person’s attachment history will therefore associate with inter-individual differences in emotional and cognitive mechanisms sustaining representations, modeling, and understanding of others on the biological and brain level. This review aims at summarizing the currently available social neuroscience data in healthy participants on how inter-individual differences in attachment associate with brain anatomy and activity across the lifespan, and to integrate these data into an extended and refined functional neuro-anatomical model of human attachment (NAMA). We first propose a new prototypical initial attachment pathway and its derivatives as a function of attachment security, avoidance, and anxiety. Based on these pathways, we suggest a neural attachment system composed of two emotional mentalization modules (aversion and approach) and two cognitive mentalization modules (emotion regulation and mental state representation) and provide evidence on their functionality depending on inter-individual differences in attachment. We subsequently expand this first-person social neuroscience account by also considering a second-person social neuroscience perspective comprising the concepts of bio-behavioral synchrony and particularly inter-brain coherence. We hope that such extended and refined NAMA can inform attachment theory and ultimately help devising new prevention and intervention strategies for individuals and families at risk for attachment-related psychopathology.

FEBRUARY 2020

You Hear It, You See It: Whether and Why Coming-of-Age Music in Video Ads Enhances Ad Effectiveness on the Wings of Autobiographical Emotional Memories

Using a sample of 2,986 subjects we studied that gene polymorphisms for the OPRM1 (rs1799971, rs17174794), OPRK1 (rs16918875, rs963549) and OPRD1 (rs569356, rs1042114) receptor genes have differential associations with the Positive (PA) and Negative (NA) dimensions of the affect schedule (PANAS) scale (categorized as positive and negative moods). The study finds that OPRM1 gene polymorphisms have both negative and positive associations with the NA and PA dimension of PANAS, respectively. The OPRK1 gene polymorphisms have positive associations with the NA but not with the PA dimension of PANAS. The OPRD1 gene polymorphisms have negative associations with the NA but not with the PA dimension of PANAS. In addition, both NA and PA dimensions of PANAS are associated with acute and chronic depression and anxiety. This genetic approach provides evidence that the three opioid receptors gene polymorphisms have divergent associations with phenotypes related to moods.

JUNE 2019

Exploring Association of Opioid Receptor Genes Polymorphism with Positive and Negative Moods using Positive and Negative Affective States Scale (PANAS)

Using a sample of 2,986 subjects we studied that gene polymorphisms for the OPRM1 (rs1799971, rs17174794), OPRK1 (rs16918875, rs963549) and OPRD1 (rs569356, rs1042114) receptor genes have differential associations with the Positive (PA) and Negative (NA) dimensions of the affect schedule (PANAS) scale (categorized as positive and negative moods). The study finds that OPRM1 gene polymorphisms have both negative and positive associations with the NA and PA dimension of PANAS, respectively. The OPRK1 gene polymorphisms have positive associations with the NA but not with the PA dimension of PANAS. The OPRD1 gene polymorphisms have negative associations with the NA but not with the PA dimension of PANAS. In addition, both NA and PA dimensions of PANAS are associated with acute and chronic depression and anxiety. This genetic approach provides evidence that the three opioid receptors gene polymorphisms have divergent associations with phenotypes related to moods.